thosedamnedbees:

I made a fancomic for http://doomsdaymydear.com

this is incredibly canon

10 notes

kaelio:

Have you ever seen something completely baffling but also technically excellent? I can’t believe how well this person edited Jane into Treasure Planet so she and Captain Amelia could fight the bad guy from Osmosis Jones. “Man,” I say to myself, “I could never make this bizarre music video about beloved animated characters becoming ghosts.”

…I… sh…ip this??

(via middlemarching)

10,256 notes

hey friends, if we’re mutual follows it would mean a lot to me if you would please tag things to do with rehoming pets, animal abuse, car accidents, death, and suicide

I am on the fragile side right now and would be very grateful if you can help keep my dash a safe place 

Sameface Part 2: Revenge of the gender dimorphism

turbomun:

A while ago, I wrote a long-ass article about a certain animated movie’s less-than-stellar treatment of its female character designs. It was not the first, last, or most popular post on the subject, but it did get over 19,000 notes, which is about 18,900 notes more than I thought it would get. By now, everyone is sick to death of hearing about Frozen, and especially about how all the women look the same. So rest assured that I’m not here today to talk about Frozen again.

Instead, I’m here to talk about The Book of Life.

image

People seem to be getting pretty hyped about this movie, and why shouldn’t they? It’s a film about Mexican culture with an actual Mexican director, and the visual style is certainly a far cry from anything that Disney has ever done. But upon my first viewing of the trailer, I couldn’t help but notice something.

image

image

image

Once again, all of the female characters have the Exact Same Face.

Okay, when I say the Exact Same Face, I don’t mean that their faces are literally exactly the same. What I do mean that if the only difference between their faces is that one has slightly more curved eyes on the top, or one has their nose and mouth placed four millimeters lower, than we have a problem…especially when the male characters look like this:

image

image

image

image

Last time, we examined why Sameface Syndrome occurs (hint: it’s not about laziness!) and I explained that it’s much more common for it to happen to women than men, since it’s tied to female beauty standards. But what exactly are those beauty standards, and why does the ubiquitous Exact Same Face appear across films and studios in a similar form every time?

Friends, welcome to the wonderful world of gender dimorphism.

Read More

(via mortalityplays)

1,475 notes

Royal Assassin abridged

the fool: hey so whatever you do don't have sex with molly
fitz: I had sex with molly
the fool: oh my god
the fool: no it's cool I'll just get the shit beaten out of me on your behalf
the fool: it's fine. it's great
fitz: HOW COULD THIS HAVE HAPPENED

slightly abridged

cafiffle: you have to finish grad school so we can get Regal off the throne and cleanse the Six Duchies
cafiffle: Chade never said this would be easy
middlemarching: wait
middlemarching: but I'm in Canada
cafiffle: do I tell you my problems
cafiffle: you have things to catalyze
cafiffle: go catalyze them
cafiffle: also now you can read minds
middlemarching: I just want to play with dogs
cafiffle: don't read the dogs' minds
middlemarching: o...k
cafiffle: I'm glad we had this talk

free-parking:

Francis Alÿs, Nightwatch, 2004.  

Surveillance cameras observe a fox exploring the Tudor and Georgian rooms of the National Portrait Gallery at night.

(via jollityfarm)

55,949 notes

I’m going to ANOTHER wedding in a few weeks, this one for my cousin, and my aunt sent me a message describing this dude to me and saying she wanted to put me on his dance card

and I was like haha sure

and now I realized a dance card might be a real thing but I have no idea how it works

10 notes

buttart:

have you heard of the 2015 Mancalendar i’m in with a bunch of rad webcomic friends??? pre-order it if you wanna see the full image of Leo up there along with sexy images of other webcomic dudes!

MANCALENDAR!!

buttart:

have you heard of the 2015 Mancalendar i’m in with a bunch of rad webcomic friends??? pre-order it if you wanna see the full image of Leo up there along with sexy images of other webcomic dudes!

MANCALENDAR!!

(via buttart)

20 notes

(Source: odinsblog, via bathtubbuccaneer)

146,564 notes

descentintotyranny:

Murtaza Hussain — Malala and Nabila: worlds apart
Unlike Malala Yousafzai, Nabila Rehman did not receive a welcoming greeting in Washington DC.
Nov. 1 2013
On October 24, 2012 a Predator drone flying over North Waziristan came upon eight-year old Nabila Rehman, her siblings, and their grandmother as they worked in a field beside their village home. Her grandmother, Momina Bibi, was teaching the children how to pick okra as the family prepared for the coming Eid holiday. However on this day the terrible event would occur that would forever alter the course of this family’s life. In the sky the children suddenly heard the distinctive buzzing sound emitted by the CIA-operated drones - a familiar sound to those in the rural Pakistani villages which are stalked by them 24 hours a day - followed by two loud clicks. The unmanned aircraft released its deadly payload onto the Rehman family, and in an instant the lives of these children were transformed into a nightmare of pain, confusion and terror. Seven children were wounded, and Nabila’s grandmother was killed before her eyes, an act for which no apology, explanation or justification has ever been given.
This past week Nabila, her schoolteacher father, and her 12-year-old brother travelled to Washington DC to tell their story and to seek answers about the events of that day. However, despite overcoming incredible obstacles in order to travel from their remote village to the United States, Nabila and her family were roundly ignored. At the Congressional hearing where they gave testimony, only five out of 430 representatives showed up. In the words of Nabila’s father to those few who did attend: "My daughter does not have the face of a terrorist and neither did my mother. It just doesn’t make sense to me, why this happened… as a teacher, I wanted to educate Americans and let them know my children have been injured."
The translator broke down in tears while recounting their story, but the government made it a point to snub this family and ignore the tragedy it had caused to them. Nabila, a slight girl of nine with striking hazel eyes, asked a simple question in her testimony: “What did my grandmother do wrong?” There was no one to answer this question, and few who cared to even listen. Symbolic of the utter contempt in which the government holds the people it claims to be liberating, while the Rehmans recounted their plight, Barack Obama was spending the same time meeting with the CEO of weapons manufacturer Lockheed Martin.
Selective Memory
It is useful to contrast the American response to Nabila Rehman with that of Malala Yousafzai, a young girl who was nearly assassinated by the Pakistani Taliban. While Malala was feted by Western media figures, politicians and civic leaders for her heroism, Nabila has become simply another one of the millions of nameless, faceless people who have had their lives destroyed over the past decade of American wars. The reason for this glaring discrepancy is obvious. Since Malala was a victim of the Taliban, she, despite her protestations, was seen as a potential tool of political propaganda to be utilized by war advocates. She could be used as the human face of their effort, a symbol of the purported decency of their cause, the type of little girl on behalf of whom the United States and its allies can say they have been unleashing such incredible bloodshed. Tellingly, many of those who took up her name and image as a symbol of the justness of American military action in the Muslim world did not even care enough to listen to her own words or feelings about the subject.
As described by the Washington Post's Max Fisher:

Western fawning over Malala has become less about her efforts to improve conditions for girls in Pakistan, or certainly about the struggles of millions of girls in Pakistan, and more about our own desire to make ourselves feel warm and fuzzy with a celebrity and an easy message. It’s a way of letting ourselves off the hook, convincing ourselves that it’s simple matter of good guys vs bad guys, that we’re on the right side and that everything is okay.

But where does Nabila fit into this picture? If extrajudicial killings, drone strikes and torture are in fact all part of a just-cause associated with the liberation of the people of Pakistan, Afghanistan and elsewhere, where is the sympathy or even simple recognition for the devastation this war has caused to countless little girls such as her? The answer is clear: The only people to be recognized for their suffering in this conflict are those who fall victim to the enemy. Malala for her struggles was to be made the face of the American war effort -  against her own will if necessary - while innumerable little girls such as Nabila will continue to be terrorized and murdered as part of this war without end. There will be no celebrity appearances or awards ceremonies for Nabila. At her testimony almost no one even bothered to attend.
But if they had attended, they would’ve heard a nine year old girl asking the questions which millions of other innocent people who have had their lives thrown into chaos over the past decade have been asking: "When I hear that they are going after people who have done wrong to America, then what have I done wrong to them? What did my grandmother do wrong to them? I didn’t do anything wrong."
Murtaza Hussain is a Toronto-based writer and analyst focused on issues related to Middle Eastern politics.
Follow him on Twitter: @MazMHussain

descentintotyranny:

Murtaza Hussain — Malala and Nabila: worlds apart

Unlike Malala Yousafzai, Nabila Rehman did not receive a welcoming greeting in Washington DC.

Nov. 1 2013

On October 24, 2012 a Predator drone flying over North Waziristan came upon eight-year old Nabila Rehman, her siblings, and their grandmother as they worked in a field beside their village home. Her grandmother, Momina Bibi, was teaching the children how to pick okra as the family prepared for the coming Eid holiday. However on this day the terrible event would occur that would forever alter the course of this family’s life. In the sky the children suddenly heard the distinctive buzzing sound emitted by the CIA-operated drones - a familiar sound to those in the rural Pakistani villages which are stalked by them 24 hours a day - followed by two loud clicks. The unmanned aircraft released its deadly payload onto the Rehman family, and in an instant the lives of these children were transformed into a nightmare of pain, confusion and terror. Seven children were wounded, and Nabila’s grandmother was killed before her eyes, an act for which no apology, explanation or justification has ever been given.

This past week Nabila, her schoolteacher father, and her 12-year-old brother travelled to Washington DC to tell their story and to seek answers about the events of that day. However, despite overcoming incredible obstacles in order to travel from their remote village to the United States, Nabila and her family were roundly ignored. At the Congressional hearing where they gave testimony, only five out of 430 representatives showed up. In the words of Nabila’s father to those few who did attend"My daughter does not have the face of a terrorist and neither did my mother. It just doesn’t make sense to me, why this happened… as a teacher, I wanted to educate Americans and let them know my children have been injured."

The translator broke down in tears while recounting their story, but the government made it a point to snub this family and ignore the tragedy it had caused to them. Nabila, a slight girl of nine with striking hazel eyes, asked a simple question in her testimony: “What did my grandmother do wrong?” There was no one to answer this question, and few who cared to even listen. Symbolic of the utter contempt in which the government holds the people it claims to be liberating, while the Rehmans recounted their plight, Barack Obama was spending the same time meeting with the CEO of weapons manufacturer Lockheed Martin.

Selective Memory

It is useful to contrast the American response to Nabila Rehman with that of Malala Yousafzai, a young girl who was nearly assassinated by the Pakistani Taliban. While Malala was feted by Western media figures, politicians and civic leaders for her heroism, Nabila has become simply another one of the millions of nameless, faceless people who have had their lives destroyed over the past decade of American wars. The reason for this glaring discrepancy is obvious. Since Malala was a victim of the Taliban, she, despite her protestations, was seen as a potential tool of political propaganda to be utilized by war advocates. She could be used as the human face of their effort, a symbol of the purported decency of their cause, the type of little girl on behalf of whom the United States and its allies can say they have been unleashing such incredible bloodshed. Tellingly, many of those who took up her name and image as a symbol of the justness of American military action in the Muslim world did not even care enough to listen to her own words or feelings about the subject.

As described by the Washington Post's Max Fisher:

Western fawning over Malala has become less about her efforts to improve conditions for girls in Pakistan, or certainly about the struggles of millions of girls in Pakistan, and more about our own desire to make ourselves feel warm and fuzzy with a celebrity and an easy message. It’s a way of letting ourselves off the hook, convincing ourselves that it’s simple matter of good guys vs bad guys, that we’re on the right side and that everything is okay.

But where does Nabila fit into this picture? If extrajudicial killings, drone strikes and torture are in fact all part of a just-cause associated with the liberation of the people of Pakistan, Afghanistan and elsewhere, where is the sympathy or even simple recognition for the devastation this war has caused to countless little girls such as her? The answer is clear: The only people to be recognized for their suffering in this conflict are those who fall victim to the enemy. Malala for her struggles was to be made the face of the American war effort -  against her own will if necessary - while innumerable little girls such as Nabila will continue to be terrorized and murdered as part of this war without end. There will be no celebrity appearances or awards ceremonies for Nabila. At her testimony almost no one even bothered to attend.

But if they had attended, they would’ve heard a nine year old girl asking the questions which millions of other innocent people who have had their lives thrown into chaos over the past decade have been asking: "When I hear that they are going after people who have done wrong to America, then what have I done wrong to them? What did my grandmother do wrong to them? I didn’t do anything wrong."

Murtaza Hussain is a Toronto-based writer and analyst focused on issues related to Middle Eastern politics.

Follow him on Twitter: @MazMHussain

(via middlemarching)

15,171 notes

No comic update today!  I got home yesterday evening and haven’t had time to make a new page.  Doomsday will resume next Saturday!

1 note

keetongu:

this is what i turned in for history homework today

(via navajomoose)

17,531 notes